management training

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In recent years, there seems to have been a widening gap in the corporate training world between expectations and reality. According to a Deloitte survey published in 2015, managers claimed that the area of learning and development was more important than ever and yet, at the same time, they admit that they’ve become even less prepared to meet learning and development needs.

Let’s make 2017 the year to turn things around. Here are four promising trends surrounding the measurement and assessment of corporate training program that can help get your company on the right track:

Measuring Corporate Training Programs1. Focus on Real Needs, First

Forget the bells and whistles of fancy corporate training programs for a moment, because it’s time to get back to basics which means deciding what your training needs really are. This seems like a crucial step in training development, but it’s one that’s often overlooked. Companies may chase after vendor-supplied corporate training programs that will claim to solve all of their problems (without understanding what those problems are), or they rely on the outdated in-house training they’ve always used—even if needs have shifted.

2017 will see a renewed effort to match up corporate training programs with real, demonstrated needs, rather than just going through the motions. This means taking stock of the company’s current realities by meeting with key leadership one on one and identifying what’s enabling your current level of success and what’s blocking you from going even higher.

 

2. Defining a Baseline for Measurement

In the same vein as the above, corporate training programs need to shift focus from what goes on during training to what happens before it begins. When it comes to measurement, that means clearly defining what you will measure as a result of the training. And, obviously, to measure improvement, you must first measure where you are.

In 2017, it’s time to get granular. Once you’ve established an understanding of your company’s “big picture” current reality, use measurement tools—like organizational surveys—to develop tangible numbers and specifics that speak to that reality. Developing a clear, specific baseline results in well-designed, responsive corporate training programs that make measuring ROI a whole lot easier.

3. Develop On-Demand Learning—and Measurement

The use of cutting-edge technology in corporate training programs has been on the rise for years. While nothing can replace immersive, experiential learning, there is most definitely a place for technology in training, especially as a learning retention tool.

Today’s workers—which is now composed of more than 53 million millennials—crave on-demand learning at their fingertips. To meet this craving, companies should look into developing retention programs that take the form of apps, which can work on computers and mobile phones and are fun, short, and effective. With up to 70 percent of training being lost to learning decay within just one week, easy-to-use and addictively engaging retention activities should help stop up the learning leak.

Plus, it’s easier and faster to track learning gains through technology. While employees are engaging in learning and retention games on their phones, companies are able to collect real-time data on learning improvements to measure progress. This allows them to make quicker decisions about changes to their corporate training programs or retention strategies. Watch for more of a focus not just on tech and learning but also on tech and measurement in 2017.

4. Bringing Training and Business Strategy Together

Perhaps the biggest trend in 2017 will be a continuation of the recent push to marry HR direction and business strategy—and measurement will play a huge role. As competition for highly skilled employees remains high, training and retaining top talent become just as much a strategic initiative as an HR one. Thus, determining ROI becomes more important than ever, as it’s an indication of whether your training is working or not, yes, but it’s also an indication of whether or not a company is retaining its competitive edge.

2017 can also be the year that companies dig deeper with assessments. In addition to more traditional assessment and measurement tactics like surveys and tests, companies should also explore how assessments can help prime the leadership pipeline—which should be a major strategic initiative for any forward-thinking organization. Companies can use post-training assessments to discover those employees who have made the largest learning gains, which is an impressive feat which higher-ups should take notice of. Plus, assessments of high performers before training can be used to identify the common competencies that a company’s highest performers share. Then, training can be designed to deliver those competencies, thus ensuring a pipeline of top talent ready to step into leadership roles when they are needed.

A clear strategy for measuring results is crucial to any successful corporate training program. What trends in measurement do you think we’ll see—or need to see—in 2017?

MichaelABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael’s singular focus is rooted in staying connected to learners the moment they step out of the classroom and back into their busy jobs. As SVP of Learning Performance, Michael brings business savvy depth to ensuring learning is reinforced, applied and is optimally aligned to delivering on strategic objectives. His proven track record in creating measurement frameworks and reinforcement solutions that add value to the learner, leaders and executive sponsors is highly valued across the spectrum of our client engagements.

Reblogged from Eagles’s Flight.

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Most training managers agree that effective measurement is a major contributor to achieving improvement goals. However, is it possible that too much measurement can have a negative impact?. The answer is yes. Like chocolate or fine wine, you can have too much of a good thing when it comes to training measurement.

YOU KNOW YOU HAVE MEASUREMENT PROBLEM IF…

The first step to solving any problem is identifying it. If you see any of these signs, it’s time to consider re-evaluating your measurement strategy:

  • Training measurement gets in the way of doing the actual work
  • Employees complain that it takes too much time to track all the data points
  • Complaints that there are too many tracking systems in place
  • You can’t find the time to prioritize and analyze the data.

Employee Training MeasurementWhile it’s true that good measurement data is essential for tracking progress, if you’re drowning in it you won’t be able to make any meaningful changes.

You might also like: Training & Development Secrets for Changing Behavior & Driving Organizational Growth

How do you solve this problem?

  • Cull your data points – Take a hard look at what you are currently measuring and how much of it you actually use. Chances are you could stop tracking certain data and never notice that it’s missing.
  • Streamline your measurement system – If employees have to spend an onerous amount of time entering data into a range of spreadsheets, your measurement strategy could be getting in the way of the job. Consider a digital measurement system that automates data collection and allows you to use a single platform across all departments.
  • Select the right measurement tools – Ensuring that you use the right tools for the job is a key factor in streamlining a measurement strategy. Switching to a digital system is a good first step, but within that you must select the appropriate combination of tools such as feedback surveys, knowledge quizzes, multi-rater assessments, and more.
  • Make sure you are using the most appropriate metrics – Every organization has unique goals, and your training measurement approach should be consistent with your internal objectives.

SELECT THE RIGHT METRICS

One problem that goes hand in hand with too much measurement is focusing on the wrong metrics. For example, metrics such as job satisfaction levels and training completions are important and valuable, but they don’t really give you the type of information that allows you to make meaningful improvements in the business. However, metrics that illuminate how the training is impacting individual jobs and the workplace as a whole will allow you to make more informed business decisions and more effectively measure training results.

For example, say you have identified a problem that many people are cancelling a software subscription because the program does not meet the purchaser’s expectations. You have determined that this is a result of the support team not sufficiently educating customers and have decided that it is worth investing in a training initiative to reduce these types of cancellations. In this case, a targeted measurement strategy might include:

How do you solve this problem?

  • Clearly define your training goals – Identify the problems you want to solve or areas for improvement and be as specific as possible.
    Example: Reduce subscription cancellations due to dissatisfaction by 25%.
  • Determine the relevant key performance indicators – Define what exactly you need to measure to monitor progress.
    Example: Track the number of customers who call to cancel versus those who subsequently decide to keep their subscription.
  • Measure consistently and often – Ongoing measurement allows you make course corrections along the way and identify which areas need improvement.
    Example: Gather subscription cancellation data for each member of the support team on a weekly basis and analyze it once each month.

This approach allows you to see which representatives are using the information delivered at the employee training, and which ones have not changed their approach to cancellation calls. Ongoing measurement enables you to take action such as refresher trainings, rewarding individuals who excel, and identifying other areas that need work.

There is no simple answer to how much training measurement is appropriate for every organization, but if you determine which data matters the most, streamline your measurement process, and use the data to produce meaningful results, you are on the right track.

MichaelABOUT THE AUTHOR

Michael’s singular focus is rooted in staying connected to learners the moment they step out of the classroom and back into their busy jobs. As SVP of Learning Performance, Michael brings business savvy depth to ensuring learning is reinforced, applied and is optimally aligned to delivering on strategic objectives. His proven track record in creating measurement frameworks and reinforcement solutions that add value to the learner, leaders and executive sponsors is highly valued across the spectrum of our client engagements.

Reblogged from Eagle’s Flight.

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I suspect there are many different viewpoints on this question, but it does help to undertake to differentiate. Here’s my take.

Management is: Supporting others within the accomplishment of their tasks.

Leadership is: Supporting others within the accomplishment of their potential.Being a great Leader

When I “manage” I listen to things like articulating goals, measuring, monitoring, recruiting, and communication.

When I “lead” I’m concerned about defining freedom of action, making resources available, coaching, instructive expectations, working out strategies, promoting innovation, and things like culture transformation and talent development.

Both are important, and necessary, when you’re responsible for others among the business context. I think the really critical issue is to know when to “lead”, and when to “manage”.

Perhaps there was a time when the calling of the manager which of the leader may well be separated. A foreman in an industrial-era mill likely didn’t have to give much thought to what he was manufacturing or to the people who were producing it. His or her job was to follow orders, organize the work, assign the right people to the necessary tasks, coordinate the results, and guarantee the job got done as ordered. The focus was on potency.

Too much management and deficient leadership can be constricting, stifling the potential contributions of your groups. They’ll still turn out (obviously), but probably not to their potential, and very possibly not even to their capability.

Too much leadership and deficient management can leave people feeling weak or overwhelmed, “at sea”, and without a solid foundation. In these circumstances actions and decisions may well be taken, but not be best when looked at through the lens of unforeseen circumstances.Manages vs leaders

In my experience, abundant of leadership is concerning “balance”. What is the right focus on any one thing, or competing things? For example, how much focus on innovation is appropriate? How much time should be spent on present needs vs. future opportunities? Resolving this balance at any point in time requires both experience and good judgment.

But with the new economy, where value comes increasingly from the knowledge of people, and where workers are no longer undifferentiated cogs in an industrial machine, management and leadership are not simply separated. People look to their managers, not simply to assign them a task, however to outline for them a purpose.  And managers should organize workers, not just to maximize potency, but to nurture skills, develop talent and inspire results.

Applying the proper balance to the time we tend managing vs. the time we spend leading is key to optimizing our own effectiveness.

About US:– Eagle’s Flight is about sparking transformation.  We’re about creating flash points where change happens, where people are inspired to do their jobs better and lead more effectively. Visit us at http://www.eaglesflightindia.com

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